Utility Blades


As I've pointed out, I have carried a pocket knife since I was a kid and it of course varied over time depending on age, interest, and task. Lately however, I started carrying a utility blade. This hasn't always been a direct replacement of my usual pocket knife. Occasionally, I will carry it in addition. Most of the time when I do this its because I am carrying a more aggressive knife and don't want to take it out for small tasks. Then again, there have been a couple times when I just carried a utility knife. What got me into this was the Gerber EAB, which I originally bought for a money clip and cover in an individual review here. As I rotated around a few options and wrote a review over key-chain flashlights, I got to thinking that I wanted to do a list of utility knives as well.


So here we are. This will be an running list of utility blades. The first section will be knives that I own and have carried. I will include a rating on grip, carrying ability, one handed opening ability, blade changing ease, affordability, etc. They will also each have a few thoughts. The second section will be utility knives I plan on acquiring in the future or would like to. I plan to continue this type of list with a few different tools like pocket screw drivers, pry bars, and wallet tools. Several of these items will more than likely get their own review at some point to cover the item in further detail. This will just be a good option for comparisons.


Without further ado, let us begin.


Current:


Gerber EAB

Grip: 4.5/5

I can get almost a full hand on this knife and there is a perfect spot to place your index right below the blade on a guard that will give you extra grip without risking your safety. The only uncomfortable area is the clip, which somewhat digs into your last couple fingers.


Carrying ability: 4/5

This can be carried as a money clip, however, I typically just clip it on my pocket like a normal knife. The clip can be a little stiff, especially at first.


One handed opening and closing: 4/5

The motion to open is a little unnatural at first because there isn't a place to push but once you figure out the pressure needed it works wonderfully. When you go to close it you simply push on the lock with your thumb and use your index finger to start closing it. I have never had problems opening or closing this knife.


Blade changing ease: 2.5/5

You have to have something thin like a coin to completely unscrew the screw holding the blade


Blade Security: 5/5

I have never felt the blade rattling around; it sits firmly in its place.


Lock Security: 4/5

Every once in a while I have felt the liner lock slip a little bit but never anywhere near the point of giving out.


Affordability: 5/5

Around $10, even cheaper on Amazon as an add-on item. Great price for what you get.

https://amzn.to/2pejVy8


Highlights:

This knife can also be used as a money clip if you choose. It is a great entry level utility blade to start EDCing


Overall: 4.2/5


Backnife

Grip: 3/5

I can get about two fingers on this knife. I typically just pinch it between my first my first two fingers and thumb while using my third finger as a back brace. I certainly wouldn't be using it for very tough tasks.


Carrying ability: 5/5

Due to the minimal design there are a number of ways to carry this knife. Most would either utilize the lanyard hole to hook it on something or slipping it into a small pocket like I do with my coin pocket.


One handed opening and closing: 5/5

This knife originally comes with a ceramic blade, which I thought was cool. However, I could never get the blade to slide and would always have to use my off hand to pull it out. Since switching to a stainless steel blade it has very easy to open and close.


Blade changing ease: 5/5

One of the absolute easiest ways to change the blade, you simply push/pull it all the way out and stick a new one in


Blade Security: 4.5/5

With the ceramic blade it never rattled when closed, however there is just a slight shift with the stainless steel blade. I would much rather take this than not be able to open and close the knife.


Lock Security: 3/5

The body has a small latch to put tension in one of the blade's grooves and you use your thumb to apply more pressure to keep the blade steady while cutting. This isn't the most secure form of blade locking but for the tasks you will be doing it mostly works.


Affordability: 4/5

By no means is this knife expensive, its about $12. That being said it is a very minimal design so there isn't much to it. I understand that a big part of that price is the ceramic blade, but for me it didn't work as intended so it wouldn't be worth it.

https://bit.ly/2MytO2W


Highlights:

This knife is a really nice minimal utility blade. Its well suited for being tossed into a pocket, or kit, or onto a bag and being forgotten until you need it.


Overall: 4.2/5


Husky Folding Lock-Back

Grip: 5/5

This utility knife has a full sized handle on it with great texture and grooves.


Carrying ability: 4.5/5

It has a pretty solid clip on it, however due to its size you definitely notice that you are carrying this knife. It doesn't blend in like a lot of other EDC utility knives which makes since because EDC isn't what this was really designed for.


One handed opening and closing: .5/5

Theoretically you should be able to one hand open this using your thumb and the knobs. However, the tension is far to tight so I always have to use two hands. There is no way that you could close this using one hand as the lock is on the spine of the handle under where your hand would be placed.


Blade changing ease: 5/5

Changing a blade is super easy, you just pull the little notch above the blade and pull the cover down.


Blade Security: 5/5

The Blade definitely stays put when carrying as it is almost fully encased. The holder is also very shallow so the blade never rattles from side to side, it fits perfectly.


Lock Security: 5/5

This is one of the toughest locks I have ever tested. It takes seriously applied pressure to disengage the lock and close the knife. Despite being under your hand during use, you don't have to worry about it accidentally closing because of the amount of required pressure.


Affordability: 5/5

This knife is under $10 at home depot and slightly more expensive at Amazon.

https://thd.co/2pcUFsc


Highlights:

This knife isn't one that I'm going to carry vary often, It's about the same size as normal pocket knife but isn't one. I typically want something smaller when I carry a utility knife. This knife is sort of a stand in for other similar designs. Many tool manufacturers make folding utility knives like this that can be carried in a pocket, but they aren't primarily designed for EDC. They can still get the job done but its up to you.


Overall: 4.2/5


Pittsburgh Folding Lock Back

Grip: 4/5

The handle is almost a full hand long with plenty of texture.


Carrying ability: 4/5

It is still relatively small and has a good pocket clip. Unfortunately, this knife is a bit wide and sits in your pocket awkwardly.


One handed opening and closing: 2/5

It is pretty easy to open one handed using the stud. However, because it is a back lock you have to use both hands to close it if you want to be safe.


Blade changing ease: 3.5/5

To change the blade you push the studs down which releases the blade from the latch so that you can just pull it out. This is a pretty simple design but unfortunately, it tends to stick and take a bit of work to get the latch released.


Blade Security: 5/5

The Blade definitely stays put when carrying as it is almost fully encased.


Lock Security: 5/5

The lock works well and has stayed secure through all of my usage.


Affordability: 4/5

This knife came in a two pack for around $10. It is a harbor freight model. I have also seen it on Amazon but the pictures were different than mine and the reviews were complaining about a changed product so I was unsure of what the situation was.


Highlights:

This is a pretty simple knife. It was also nice to have a tiny extra utility knife to stick in something like a tackle box. I have had this for years and it sat for a long time in my tool box until I decided to give it a try as an EDC item.


Overall: 3.9/5


Quark Tool

Grip: 3.5/5

This knife is obviously super small, which affects the grip that you can have on it. It does have jimping on the top and bottom that can add some stability. Ultimately, I end up using my thumb and index finger for the majority of the grip and use my second and third fingers for support. One thing I noticed was that continuous cutting does start to cause the metal to dig into your had a little bit. This isn't horrible but annoying all the same.


Carrying ability: 5/5

Because of the minimal design it is super easy to carry this knife. It has a hole that can be used to attach a lanyard, key ring, or other devices. I carry it in my coin pocket just like the Backnife.


One handed opening and closing: 3.5/5

The instructions describe using two hands when opening and it definitely is designed that way. However, with practice you can get it opening and closing with one hand. It just takes patience and a good grip.


Blade changing ease: 4.5/5

To change the blade you just pull it all the way out when opening.


Blade Security: 2.5/5

The lade definitely rattles around a lot and because the body is also metal it makes a distinct clinking. If you carry it like I do in my pocket then this won't be as big of a problem.


Lock Security: 4.5/5

The lock is very secure as you will be able to tell from the difficulty in even opening or closing the knife in the first place. The key is to not over bend the top piece that holds the lock so that it will stay in the correct position.


Affordability: 3/5

Keep in mind that this is a very minimal design that costs around $20. I used a coupon that brought it down from $25 to $21. Currently it is actually on sale for $19.95 which is probably the best you are going to find.

http://bit.ly/2NqZ2OV


Highlights:

I have just started carrying this knife for the past couple of days after it arrived. I really like the design and look forward to seeing how I like it.


Overall: 3.7/5


Gil-Tek RUK

Grip: 4/5

The body has nice grooves for your fingers as well as jimping for your thumb. I do wish there was a slightly different design for your index finger as it is pretty close to the blade but it isn't to bad. I also added a para-cord lanyard so that I could get a slightly better grip.


Carrying ability: 4/5

This blade is just to big to fit in my coin pocket meaning I carry it in my regular pocket. However, because it doesn't have a clip it falls to the bottom. The para-cord helps me to find it.


One handed opening and closing: 4.5/5

It takes a little getting used to but to open the blade you have to bush away from you and then slide it out. They described it as similar to a USB which I felt was appropriate. The blade then locks into two notches. Once you figure out the pressure needed and do it a couple times it becomes easy to get consistently open and closed correctly.


Blade changing ease: 3.5/5

To change the blade you have to work it around the notches that hold it in place and slide it out of the end of the body. To get a blade back in you kind of have to jiggle it so that you can get it going into the right angle. You also have to push the lever in the body back so that you can get the blade over it. This process isn't awful but it doesn't feel natural.


Blade Security: 5/5

The blade doesn't jingle at all when it is closed. It feels very secure in the body.


Lock Security: 4/5

When the blade is extended it is held in place by two notches so it doesn't feel like it is going anywhere. The only thing is it takes a little practice to consistently get the blade in place on the first try and because it has two notches you are limited on how the blade is placed.


Affordability: 3.5/5

I purchased my RUK using a coupon for $30 they are normally $35 for the aluminum version. They also have a titanium version that is $85. I think this is a good middle of the road option. It isn't crazy expensive but you can also find other options for cheaper. That being said, for what you get I think it is definitely reasonably priced.


http://bit.ly/2MAlP5D


Highlights:

Just FYI this version is the black cerakoated aluminum. They have discontinued this option and now their aluminum versions will be anodized instead. After carrying this for a couple weeks after receiving it I am very pleased. It has been swapped out a couple of times with my main carry but mostly it has been my option for a minimal carry. My only real gripe is that it doesn't have a pocket clip, which I feel it had room for but it just may not have worked due to the design of the pressure bar on the back.


Overall: 4/5


Techni Edge REVO

Grip: 4/5

The REVO does feature a full sized handle with a large opening for your index finger. However, I noticed that this hole causes my index finger to get slightly out of alignment with the rest of my hand and is not as comfortable as I expected


Carrying ability: 3/5

There are some pros and cons to this design. First, it has a pocket clip which gives it a great ability to be carried in an organized way. That being said it is the size of a full sized folding knife so this will probably need to take the place of your main blade and not as a secondary blade.


One handed opening and closing: 0/5

This knife features a button that you have to press to unlock the folding action with your other hand. This button as well as the rotation is somewhat stiff. When you combine this with the two separate positions you can carry the blade at mean that you are going to be using two hands opening and closing this knife.


Blade changing ease: 4.5/5

Changing a blade is very easy, you just push a button and slide the blade in and out. I did notice that sometimes the blade kind of catches when you are trying to insert it but this doesn't last long.


Blade Security: 5/5

The blade does have a little bit of play if you try and move it but it isn't going anywhere.


Lock Security: 4/5

The lock is super sturdy and definitely keeps the knife in the correct position. The only reason I give this a four instead of five is that the lock design is also what contributes to the difficulty to open.


Affordability: 5/5

This is a box cutter through and through. It does enable you to carry it a little easier than traditional utility knives. At $12 you pretty much get what you pay for. That doesn't mean this is a piece of junk by any means in fact it feels pretty solid, but don't expect anything extra from this tool.


https://amzn.to/2JwS99z


Highlights:

I have to say the big features for this knife would have to be the solid construction and the size. Even though I am not as big a fan of the size it could be a plus for someone who is looking for a utility blade as their main carry.


Overall: 3.6/5


Outdoor Edge Slidewinder

Grip: 3.5/5

For the most part the Slidewinder fits in your had decently. However, due to the location of some of the points it is easy to feel it dig into your palm a little bit. In addition the usage of the slide mechanism forces you to place your thumb on the spine after opening the blade. This is not terribly uncomfortable it is just not always what I desire. Also the pocket clip does tend to dig a little bit if you angle it in your hand wrong.


Carrying ability: 5/5

The Slidewinder is a very small tool so it does not take up a significant amount of space or add weight. In addition, it also features a nice pocket clip which has allowed to to easily store in my coin pocket. If that does not work for you then there is always a small lanyard hole that can be utilized.


One handed opening and closing: 5/5

As the name implies this tool uses a slide mechanism in order to facilitate opening and closing.


Blade changing ease: 5/5

In order to change the blade on the Slidewinder you simply hold the locking button down and pull out the blade. Then you insert a new one.


Blade Security: 4.5/5

There is a slight wiggle that comes from shaking the Slidewinder but this is actually the slide mechanism rather than the blade.


Lock Security: 4/5

My only issue with the lock is that it is pretty easy to accidentally press the lock button during usage if you have your thumb anywhere but the top ridge. This is where your thumb is technically supposed to go, but occasionally I like to have mine on the side so I have run into this problem a few times.


Affordability: 5/5

At approximately ten dollars I find that this tool is a very appropriately priced item. It gives you a really solid tool that is easy to EDC for a very nice price.


https://amzn.to/2xfUGAc


Highlights:

The Outdoor Edge Slidewinder features not only a well designed utility blade holder but also a phillips and flat head driver as well as an integrated bottle opener. The slide mechanism is not perfect but it is effective and fun to use.


Overall: 4.5/5


StatGear X-Blade

Grip: 4/5

The key for me with this tool is making sure that the blade stays turned in the right direction. I like the blade running perpendicular to the little grooves near the base. I place my thumb and index fingers in these grooves so that I have pretty good control. I am able to manipulate the blade into whatever material that I am trying to cut open. As long as the very bottom of the base what tightens the blade does not get turned then it has been a satisfying design.


Carrying ability: 4/5

The X-Blade Pocket is pretty easy to carry as you would expect from the name. I tied a little piece of para-cord to the lanyard hole so that it gives me a little bit of extra material to grab out of the fifth pocket where I keep it. I do prefer having some sort of pocket clip but it obviously would not fit the design.


One handed opening and closing: 1/5

While I have technically opened the X-Blade with just one hand, it is definitely not meant to be done. Because it is a twist cap you are going to have difficulty getting the cap off which places your fingers in close proximity to a very sharp blade which is not ideal. While one handed opening is a very nice feature, having to use both hands to safely operate this item does not cause to much of a hassle.


Blade changing ease: 4/5

In order to change the blade in a X-Blade Pocket you first need to take the cap off. Then you twist the base until the blade is loos at which point you can remove the blade. In order to put in a new blade you just reverse the order. This is also the point that you will want to make sure the blade is facing whatever direction is most comfortable for you.


Blade Security: 5/5

When the knife is in my pocket I don't feel or hear the blade rattling.


Lock Security: 4/5

For the most part I don't really have many problems with the blade staying secure during usage. The only exception is that occasionally like I mentioned earlier, the base might get turned a little bit, which allows for the glade to come loose. This is a simple fix once you notice it but it has happened.


Affordability: 5/5

This version has been on sell for a while over at StatGear at around $10 so it is pretty cheap. In addition not only do you get something to use as a utility knife like I do, but it also functions as a pretty good craft knife that you can carry.


http://bit.ly/2DI1D0G


Highlights:

As of right now this is the only item on the list that utilizes something other than a standard utility blade. There are a few other items that will eventually be added but for now the X-Blade Pocket is the only craft knife design. In addition, there are two other versions that will give you a full sized tool rather than this minimal approach.


Overall: 3.9/5


Workpro Folding Utility Knives

This is not actually the Workpro version, it is another identical design that came in a combo tool pack I picked up.


Grip: 4.5/5

This knife gives you a full handed grip once you open it. My only issue, which is why it was not a five, is that some of the edges are relatively sharp and hard meaning that it can create some hot spots.


Carrying ability: 5/5

I am always in favor of a pocket clip and enjoy carrying this knife in my pockets because it is so thin I hardly notice it.


One-handed opening and closing: 4/5

I have become comfortable opening and closing this knife, but it definitely takes some practice. The opening is definitely the harder motion as you must catch a very small ridge in order to rotate the hinge. I hold it in my hand with my fourth finger on the thumb side so that I can pinch the body and keep it secure. Closing the knife is relatively easy because it functions just like a normal frame lock folding knife.


Blade changing ease: 5/5

In order to change the blade, the knife must first be opened at least enough for the blade to clear the body. Then you push up on a small ridge/lever in between the blade and thumb ridge. Once that is done the blade is free to be removed and changed. As soon as you release the lever the lock will lower back down and catch the grooves on the spine of the blade.


Blade Security: 4.75/5

There is a very small amount of blade play once it is opened but there is not enough to cause any large rattle either during use or in your pocket.


Lock Security: 4/5

The frame lock feels very secure, and because this is a utility blade you should never really have a problem. For some reason though the part of the body that holds the blade is just slightly shorter than it needs to be. This allows it to wiggle a little bit at the hinge, but when your hand is on the grip you do not notice it.


Affordability: 5/5

For $15 you can get three of these utility knives. This is definitely one of the best deals if you are looking for a utility knife for your EDC.


https://amzn.to/2RuCPRk


Highlights:

With this design, you get a full hand grip, a frame lock, and a pocket clip. They may not include other additional features that some pocket tools come with, but this allows you to carry a very simple and durable utility knife.


Overall: 4.6/5


Screwpop

Grip: 2/5

The Screwpop is incredibly simple in its design. While this is nice for the most part it does create some problems when using the knife. I have noticed that because of how thing and light the body is it will somewhat roll in your hand if you hold it like a normal knife. I have found the best way to hold the Screwpop to be with your thumb pressing down on the side pinching it between itself and your index finger.


Carrying ability: 5/5

One of the Screwpop's biggest advantages is how easy it is to carry. Like most of these knives it is easy to slip it into my fifth pocket and forget about it. This design also makes it easy to carry on your key-chain due to the large ring at the back.


One-handed opening and closing: 2.5/5

While there are definitely knives out there and even on this list that are harder to operate one-handed, the Screwpop failed to meet my expectations. Opening and closing the blade is supposed to be simple as you just lift the lever and slide the blade. However, I have found it difficult to get good enough leverage with my finger in order to lift the lever. This has also been uncomfortable for my finger tip as it has to dig under the bar. This might be a more isolated problem and my model might be a little bit to tight.


Blade changing ease: 4/5

The only problem with changing the blade is the difficulty I have in lifting the lever. Otherwise you just slide the old blade out and a new one in.


Blade Security: 3.5/5

While closed the blade stays secure thanks to a magnet integrated into the body. Unfortunately, when the blade is extended and in use it rattles significantly which I have found bothersome.


Lock Security: 4/5

As difficult as it has been to lift the lever when I want it, I have noticed that during use if my index finger is in just the right place it can slightly move the lever. This could easily go unnoticed and lead to the lock disengaging. While I think this is very unlikely it is something to consider.


Affordability: 5/5

The Screwpop is priced similarly to other small utility knives at $10. For this price you get a very simple design without any flash, which is not a complaint, most of the time when I want a utility knife I am just looking for the blade holder itself.


https://amzn.to/2NMMTmQ


Highlights:

I like the addition of the magnet, it gives the Screwpop a unique feature.


Overall: 3.7/5


Big Idea Design Titanium Pocket Tool



Grip: 3/5

The thin body does make for a couple of hot spots that you can feel during usage but my main complaint is that my index finger is precariously close to the blade. For the most part I have been using the included safe blades so I have not had to worry about cutting myself very much but it is still a thought. I have found that the paracord lanyard on the end has proven to be helpful in giving me additional grip, as the overall shape does not feel incredibly comfortable in my hand and I feel like I have to grip harder than I should.


Carrying ability: 5/5

First and foremost, this is my first titanium utility knife which means I have had to get used to just how light the tool is. That being said, the TPT carries extremely well and you have a few different options. Obviously, you could simply carry the TPT loose in your pocket, but that is highly undesirable to me. Like most of these tools I carry the TPT in my fifth pocket for easy access. However, if that is not your cup of tea you can easily use the lanyard/key-ring hole to attach the tool to something like your keys. Lastly, you can also keep utilize the leather sheath that comes with it in order to carry the TPT loose without being scratched. The only change I would make would be the integration of a pocket clip, but that was a consideration they applied for the next generation TPT Slide, which is exciting.


One-handed opening and closing: 3.5/5

The TPT can be somewhat difficult to operate one-handed. However, with enough practice and usage it will begin to feel natural. Big Idea Design does provide a tutorial on how to open the TPT one-handed which is pretty self explanatory, but here is a quick overview. You place your index finger on the little notch on the face of the body and press towards yourself which opens the body. Then you slide the blade out using your thumb until you get it in the correct position. Like I said this is not the most natural of motions and even though I have gotten used to it I still fell the metal dig into my finger a little bit. However, Big Idea Design did take this into consideration and made a major upgrade in the TPT Slide by utilizing a slide mechanism, hence the name.


Blade changing ease: 4/5

As long as you can get the blade opened, then changing it is very simple. While holding the body apart to open the blade you simply pull it out and replace it with a new one.


Blade Security: 5/5

Once the blade is completely behind the lock and the body is closed, it stays in place. While you can grab the blade and slide it forward and backward to a degree, a magnet in the body keeps the blade from rattling while you carry it.


Lock Security: 4.5/5

While I do not feel any problems with the actual security of the lock there is one small issue that I want to point out that kept this from being a five. When you are engaging the blade you are holding the lock open with your finger. Once you get the blade into your desired location you release the tension and the body snaps back together. The problem is that sometime the lock does not align completely which forces you to make a minor adjustment to the blade before you can use it. This is not a major problem and as it does not cause a significant inconvenience but nevertheless it is there.


Affordability: 2/5

I personally did not plan on picking up a TPT any time soon because at $70 it was just out of my price range for a utility knife. However, I got lucky and came across a sale which made me feel better about the purchase. While the TPT is a fantastic product, the construction, design, and additional items include are great, that price point just feels wrong. I understand that one of the biggest cost drivers here is the titanium and that makes sense, it just feels a bit out of reach when you can get similar items for much cheaper. That being said, there are definitely utility knives that are even more expensive that this without having any justification other than the name, so take all of that with a grain of salt if you will.


http://bit.ly/2EPkXcH


Highlights:

The TPT features a few extra tools packed into its compact frame. At the rear of the body you have access to a pry-bar/flat-head driver as well as a 1/4" hex bit slot. At the front of the body the TPT features a series of wrench options that cap off with a bottle opener. While the they do include a few other features in the construction those are probably going to be your most used besides the actually utility blade, which brings me to my final point. The TPT comes with two separate safety blades that lack an edge but also feature integrated tines which allow the tool to be used as an improvised eating utensil.


Overall: 3.85/5


Yeeyou Utility Knife

Grip: 2/5

The Yeeyou is a very hard and thin piece of metal at its most basic design. While this does help it keep a low profile and minimize some of the weight it also mean that there are quite a few potential hot spots. The top of the spine at the rear digs into your palm pretty significantly. At the bottom of the back end you have a very pointy Philips driver that also does a great job of jabbing your finger or hand depending on how exactly you are holding it. I also really wish that they would have included gimping on the spine so that your thumb has a more secure gripping point. To end on a positive note, the bottom of the handle does have gimping so at least that helps a little bit.


Carrying ability: 4/5

I feel incredibly repetitive here but like most EDC utility knives the Yeeyou can easily slip into a pocket and almost be forgotten. If that is not your style then you can always hook it onto a key ring using the ridiculously large hex wrench at the rear of the body although be prepared for it to jangle quite a bit. I say ridiculously large because it certainly won't support a standard hex bit and they don't specify what size it is. Plus there is only one so I hope that will be the perfect fit. This knife also comes with a faux leather carrying case which is a nice touch but for me just is unnecessary.


One-handed opening and closing: 4/5

I was actually surprised at how easy it was to operate the Yeeyou one handed. When looking at it it seems like somewhat of a nightmare, but after some practice it becomes much easier. In order to open the blade I lift the lever at the front with my index finger and then use my thumb to slide the blade into place with the gap in the middle of the body. Sometimes it does prove a bit difficult to get enough room and traction for your thumb, but this is most difficult with new blades that still have oil coating them as they are obviously slick. The spring that holds the lever can also be a bit stiff sometimes but this is a less frequent problem. In order to close the blade, I pull the lever back using my thumb and index finger and point the body upwards. This allows the blade to gently fall back into the body. I will also note that this knife is truly ambidextrous so that is going to be a nice added bonus for some people.


Blade changing ease: 5/5

It is pretty easy to change the blade, I tend to lift the lever using my thumb and index finger like when closing the blade but then pulling the blade out with the other hand. Then you just reverse the process. You can start the process with one hand but at a certain point you will need to utilize your other hand to complete the change.


Blade Security: 1/5

The frame does not create a whole lot of tension on the blade, which helps when you open and close it, but this allows the blade to rattle quite a bit both when extended and closed.


Lock Security: 2.5/5

The lock is held in place with a spring that slides the bar into one of the slots on the blade. I have not have any problems so far but I can see just the right amount of pressure hitting the blade at a certain angle and the lock failing. As I said, his has not been a problem but I can see the lever sliding back up the blade slot and it collapsing back in on itself.


Affordability: 4.5/5

At approximately $12 the Yeeyou is pretty affordable. You can find pretty similar items around that price point so it is appropriate in my opinion. The bonus on this end is that for that price you get the knife, a carrying case, and a case of extra blades.


https://amzn.to/2DXyRdv


Highlights:

Overall, what you get is pretty much it. They tired to pack a bunch of extra tools into the frame like a driver, window breaker, bottle opener, and hex wrench, but none of them perform outstanding and are just kind of there. As I mentioned earlier it is nice that it comes with a few extra blades and the carrying case, even if you carry it another way. There really isn't much else to say.


Overall: 3.3/5


BATTLBOX Daily Utility Tool (DUT)

Grip: 3/5

The DUT is a very small utility knife which makes it somewhat difficult to handle. I had a hard time keeping the handle steady as it is pretty slick and the general shape of the handle is uncomfortable to hold. As long as you reserve this tool for very light duty tasks you will be fine.


Carrying ability: 5/5

The DUT is incredibly small like most of the tools on this list. It will fit perfectly in your fifth pocket if you carry it like myself. In addition there is a small lanyard hole on one corner that will allow you to hang it from a key-ring or similar set up.


One-handed opening and closing: 5/5

In order to open or close the blade, you push the slide on the face of the body which changes the blade position. There is pretty much no reason to have your other hand anywhere near the DUT.


Blade changing ease: 1/5

If you need to change the blade on the DUT you actually have to completely unscrew the torx screws in the body and separate it. You also have to make sure that you keep the magnet and slide in their correct locations or they could easily get lost.


Blade Security: 5/5

There is a tiny bit of noise if you shake the body but this is actually the slide rattling in the blade slot rather than the blade itself. The magnet inside the body actually does an amazing job of keeping the blade locked down in the handle.


Lock Security: 0/5

There is no lock on the DUT, you hold the blade open with your thumb. While you don't have to worry about the blade collapsing and injuring a finger but it could easily render the tool useless.


Affordability: 4.5/5

For only $12 the Daily Utility Tool is pretty cheap. However, at the same time it does not really offer much and you could easily pick up another option for around the same price.


https://amzn.to/2WuEG7A


Highlights:

Very minimal design and easy to carry.


Overall: 3.35/5


GIL-TEK RUK V2

Grip: 3.75/5

I like the addition of a pry bar on the back as it is a nice feature, but this has also created somewhat of a hotspot when you grip the RUK.


Carrying ability: 4/5

Similarly to the previous version the V2 is easily pocket-able and fits great into any carry. I do hope that they develop a pocket clip like has been hinted at because it would make the RUKs even easier to carry. Until that point I still find it easiest to stick a lanyard on the rear and keep it in a pocket or slip.


One-handed opening and closing: 4.25/5

While there is little changed from the last version there was a slight alteration in the overall size of the frame as well as the introduction of pins that keep the body together and provide a surface for the blade to slide on. I think that this might be what is causing a slight problem during use. It has not been incredibly common but I have had the blade slide up a bit when opening the blade. This has caused the blade to interact with the opening of the body and stop the blade from fully extending.


Blade changing ease: 4/5

GIL-TEK kept the same method of blade changing so there is very little to add here.


Blade Security: 5/5

Just like the previous version GIL-TEK did a great job in making sure that the tension bar was strong enough to hold the blade securely and avoid it jiggling.


Lock Security: 4/5

While the lock is mostly secure, I have been able to wiggle the blade loos and pulling it out without actually following the proper process. I do not expect this to be a major issue but I could imagine this happening if it is used with very tough material and a lot of back and extra motion.


Affordability: 3.75/5

Starting at $35 and ranging all the way up to $85 it may seem that this is still pretty expensive. However, they kept the same price points as before the update which incorporated several new features. I feel that this warrants the price point it is set at.


http://bit.ly/2XKZKHA


Highlights:

Comes in several different varieties as GIL-TEK tries new combinations ranging from types of anodizing to the variation in material. With the new version of the RUK here were several additional features that were added to increase the utility of of this tool. Not only is there the standard bottle opener like the previous incarnation but with this version they have added a bit slot, a pry bar point, and a slot where you can use the blade to cut items like string.


Overall: 4.1/5




EDCFans Utility Knife

Grip: 2/5

I have a hard time really getting a good purchase on this body. Luckily most tasks are pretty light so i am not worried but with how thin and smooth the body is I just can't really feel secure. There is also just the general shape as it is pretty rectangular and this means that there are no spots for your finger to really grab onto.


Carrying ability: 4.5/5

Pretty similar to most other competitors, this design easily store in your pockets and fades away. In addition, it also incorporates an additional slot for a key-ring or lanyard.


One-handed opening and closing: 4/5

This operation actually reminds me somewhat of the TPT from Big Idea Design. you simply press the button and use another finger to slide the blade out. With your right hand it is actually pretty easy once you get used to the space that the opening gives you. However, if you want to use your left hand, this will prove much more difficult, at least in my experience.


Blade changing ease: 5/5

Blade changing is very easy, you just press the button and slide the used blade out, then reverse the process with a new blade.


Blade Security: 5/5

You can wiggle the blade a small amount if you try but during normal storage the blade remains relatively stationary and silent.


Lock Security: 3/5

I have not had a major issue yet with the lock but I am somewhat skeptical of it. The lock is just secured with the spring button that you push. This doesn't feel like the most secure way to lock down a blade. I also notice quite a lot of wiggle when the blade is extended which is an additional issue.


Affordability: 4/5

This style is decently priced, I will add that you can find other identical models with varying prices. They tried to cram on a lot of extra tools to make it more of a deal but these tools feel gimmicky and poorly executed.


https://amzn.to/2XbCX7y


Highlights:

I don't really have much to add here. If the extra tools were of better quality they would definitely feel like a big plus but they just don't really feel very well designed.


Overall: 3.93/5




Korcraft Everyday Blade

Grip: 3/5

The Everyday Blade is very small and minimal. While this is very nice it also means that it can be a little bit more difficult to get a good grip on. One thing that it does have going for it is the texturing on the slide. While this does offer some support it also could have been higher up to give your thumb a better purchase. The clip also acts as a bit of a added component but can definitely be a hot-spot if you don't watch out. Luckily most of the cutting tasks you will be completing should be relatively light so you probably won't have to much of a problem.


Carrying ability: 5/5

First and foremost, this thing has a pocket clip so in my book that makes it infinitely better. The clip is about two-thirds of the length of the body so it maintains a nice grip on your pocket. Like most of these utility knives I keep it in my fifth pocket and the clip just makes it easier to retrieve.


One-handed opening and closing: 4.5/5

The Everyday Blade features a very unique opening system. Using your thumb you push a slide upwards and use another finger to rotate the wheel thus exposing the blade and pushing it into place. Once the blade is all the way exposed it will lock into place when you release the slide. To close the blade like most cases you just reverse the order and make sure the blade is locked back. The slide was somewhat stiff and difficult to open at first but has luckily loosened up some. This is mostly due to how strong the spring is and, as I mentioned earlier, the low placement of the slide texture. The Everyday Blade is also unique in that you can switch which side of the wheel the blade is attached to. This means that it can be operated in both a right and left handed manner depending on the person.


Blade changing ease: 4/5

When you need to change the blade you extend the blade and unscrew the pivot on the back of the frame above the clip. This can easily be done by hand but also features slots for something like a coin or flat-head. My only complaint is that when opening the blade the pivot screw has tended to loosen and I have to tighten it back. Luckily the Blade has not come loose but I could easily imagine this happening if I were not vigilant.


Blade Security: 4/5

When extended the blade can wiggle a small amount but it will not shake unless you put effort into it, unless the pivot is loose. At that point anything is fair game.


Lock Security: 4/5

When extended the wheel features a locking piece that keeps it from rotating to far as well as the slide that keeps it from closing back inwards. As long as you are mindful of your thumb placement you should be fine with the slide lock. Once again there is a concern with the pivot as a loose one could make your blade behave in a different way than was intended.


Affordability: 4.5/5

The Everyday Blade is currently available for pre-order on Indiegogo for about $17 and will rise to $20 when it goes to normal pricing. At that price point I think it is a reasonable product. It has a few things that could be improved but overall it is a really solid product that features a ton of uses and feels very durable.


http://bit.ly/2SglsBt


Highlights:

It was incredibly handy that Korcraft included several additional blades of varying shapes along with a custom insert as a bottle opener. I'll be honest I don't really have any plans on using the bottle opener but it is nice that it is an option. The ability to alter it into a left handed tool is also a huge plus as that is usually left out.


Overall: 4.14/5




Drop Ferrum Forge RUK

Grip: 3/5

Looking at the underside of this RUK you would actually imagine that it holds pretty comfortably in your hand, however, I have found that because I must press the slide continuously to use the blade it forces the rest of my hand back to the point that I loose the ergonomic benefits. Because of this I am only really able to get two fingers on the body while the rest hold the lanyard I attached.


Carrying ability: 4/5

Because it is super small I carry it in my fifth pocket like most of these knives but I will add that attaching it to your keys would be a real option because of how minimal it is.


One-handed opening and closing: 5/5

This RUK is designed to be used completely one handed. A self retracting slide holds the blade in place. In order to extend the blade for use you simply push the knob forward and hold. When you are done you can either let the slide go or guide it back into the retracted position.


Blade changing ease: 0.5/5

Your best bet for changing the blade or cleaning the internal components is to take the front plate off which requires a torx bit. This is an extremely tedious process that could have been much easier. My first instinct was to remove the slide bot, it can be removed with just your fingers, and slide the blade out, but this was not possible.


Blade Security: 5/5

The blade remains steady and solid when retracted and does not wiggle at all thanks to the stiff spring behind it.


Lock Security: 2/5

Obviously this blade does not lock as it is self-retracting as I mentioned earlier. I have mixed feelings about that. On one hand the blade should always be able to be secured within the body however, I have seen incidents where blades like this slid unintentionally and actually sliced into a finger or hand. While this is pretty rare, I just like the extra security.


Affordability: 2.5/5

If you are looking to spend $40 on a little craft knife then by all means this is a great option. However, I think that at that price point you really aren't getting a ton for your money. There are plenty of other options that either give you the same basic blade for far less, or give you more features for around the same price if not slightly less.


http://bit.ly/311JzY1


Highlights:

First and foremost, I picked this up because it was a new brass option. I don't think I will carry it a ton outside of when I actually carry brass gear. The spring will be a big plus to some people as will the fact that it uses craft blades.


Overall: 2.857/5





Coming soon:


Crane

http://bit.ly/2DKCmmB




Additional Options:


Rexford RUT

http://bit.ly/2NgccJF


Scout Compact Utility Blade

http://bit.ly/2Iyc7Aj


Maker Knife

http://bit.ly/2EMl0I2


RovyVon Valor

http://bit.ly/2DaIBjt


MecArmy EK16

https://amzn.to/2DaIPXR


AVIS-Pry Titanium Tool

https://etsy.me/2Qsu3CY


Big Idea Design TPT Slide

http://bit.ly/2EOjT8I


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